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About the Bank

The New 200-PISO Note

  1. Why the 200-piso?
    To bridge the big jump from the 100-piso to the 500-piso note, BSP found a need to issue a 200-piso. Other countries like Mexico also have a 200-denominated note. Recently the European Union of Spain, Italy, Germany, France, Amsterdam, etc. issued the 200-Euro.
  2. How does the 200-piso look like?
    It is similar to our existing notes in circulation, 60 mm. x 166 mm. Its dominant colors are green, violet and pink.

    On the front side is the portrait of former President Diosdado P. Macapagal and the Aguinaldo Shrine where the declaration of the first Philippine Independence was held on June 12, 1898. The back side shows President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo being sworn in as the 10th President of the Philippine Republic on January 20, 2001 as a result of the EDSA II.
  3. What special features does the 200-piso note have?
    For the first time, a Philippine banknote bears a feature for the blind and the visually impaired. At the top left front side of the 200-piso note is a print that can be easily felt by touch. By running a finger over the print, a visually impaired or blind would be able to differentiate it from the other notes in circulation.
  4. What are the security features that will make the note difficult to counterfeit?
    Like the 100-, 500-, and 1000-piso notes, the new 200-piso contains the following security features:
    • Paper is 20 percent abaca and 80 percent cotton fiber.
    • A shadowy effect of the portrait of President Diosdado P. Macapagal when viewed against the light, otherwise known as the watermark.
    • 10 mm gold color iridescent vertical band bearing the number"200" in a series. The gold band glows when viewed at an angle.
    • 1.4 mm stitch-like security thread bearing a series of the number"200" in microprint. The security thread changes in color from green to magenta or vice-versa when viewed at different angles.